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TheCrazedMadman
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Realistic Field of View settings for a 3D Walkthrough

I'm new to SH3D (absolutely loving it!), and I want to find a good, realistic setting for if you were walking through the space. I know the default is 63 (which is the FOV of a camera), but a person's actual FOV is 120....so I'm just curious what a good value is.

I'm currently trying to get a sense of if a room is too small to stand in/and walk around or not, thanks!
[Mar 17, 2017 8:21:15 PM] Show Printable Version of Post    View Member Profile    Send Private Message    http://immersivetech.co [Link] Report threatening or abusive post: please login first  Go to top 
hansmex
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Re: Realistic Field of View settings for a 3D Walkthrough

I usually use something between 75 and 90 degrees. 120 deg looks like a fisheye lens. You have to experiment what suits you best.

H
[Mar 18, 2017 5:29:22 PM] Show Printable Version of Post    View Member Profile    Send Private Message    Hidden to Guest [Link] Report threatening or abusive post: please login first  Go to top 
Jonnie63
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Re: Realistic Field of View settings for a 3D Walkthrough

This is my understanding of it.

First the default as you state is 63 degrees

Secondly the average person has a horizontal field of view including peripheral of 180 degrees so a factor of 3.

Peripheral vision is not terribly important for detail but it will affect perception a great deal - does the scene feel claustrophobic,
does it feel like you are looking out of a smallish window rather than seeing the "whole thing".

I use a large TV as a second monitor which I place on the desk behind my laptop.

Taking into account where I sit and distances the screen does indeed subtend an angle of about 60 degrees to my eyes but lets just say it is 63 degrees so its exactly the same as the default SweetHome setting.

This means that a 63 degree field of view in SweetHome is almost exactly right for my set up, the view is realistic (especially centre screen) and it is equivalent to holding a frame the same size as my screen at the same distance at which I usually view the screen and looking around at the real world ignoring everything outside the frame. I should see fairly minimal distortion but at the cost of only seeing one third of what I could see if I did not restrict my view to the frame.

I suppose another way of looking at this is that the role of the software, hardware and your settings is as much as possible to show
you what you would see of the real world if your computer screen turned transparent and you chose to view the world through it.

If I had a spherically curved TV that wrapped around my viewing position a full 180 degrees and if I could set up a view in SweetHome of 180 degrees then a virtual view COULD be constructed that looked almost identical to the one we see in real life and one that would allow us to exploit the full potential of our eyes.

Flat screens introduce distortions, as a screen gets wider and wider or the viewer gets closer and closer things at the extreme left or right will tend to look thinner for the central viewer whereas a viewer to the extreme left or right will have a different experience, so for a true ultra wide screen experience without distortion you need to place the viewer at the centre of a spherical screen and do all rendering calculations in a spherical frame of reference. Flat screens are fine just so long as they do not get too wide or the viewer too close but that does mean we have to give up on our ability to see a 180 degree field of view.

In many ways spherical screens are the simplest to understand. You imagine your eyes at the centre of a large spherical screen, you think of a ray of light coming from a distant point and which pixel on the screen it would pass through. That is the pixel you need to light up to give the viewer the same experience (ignoring depth perception).

As a thought experiment the only way I can see that a flat screen could provide lets say a 150 degree field of view would be if the viewer sat very close to the screen and then the software provided the correct counter distortions to nullify the effect of the flat screen but the software would be tuned to that specific viewing postion a viewer at a different position would need a different set of counter distortions to nullify the effect of the flat screen.

At the end of the day you cannot design a flat screen that suits all viewing positions but flat screens give fairly distortion free
images as long as you view them from a reasonable distance which is the same as saying they must subtend a fairly low angle ( say 60 degrees or less ) with your eye.

My penny worth I am sure there are others with more expertise who can correct or give greater clarity.
[Mar 31, 2019 3:46:16 PM] Show Printable Version of Post    View Member Profile    Send Private Message [Link] Report threatening or abusive post: please login first  Go to top 
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