Print at Aug 22, 2019 7:32:41 PM
Posted by slimpy at Dec 31, 2014 3:08:04 PM
Reality Check
While designing the interior of our new flat (see kitchen images posted earlier) I was wondering how realistic the rendered images would be.
I then decided to find out by modeling our current living room.
This is how it turned out:


full size

full size

Scene facts:
- 17 light sources
- 16 custom-made furniture models, including fireplace and window
- 4 adapted models
- 4 stock models
- render time at best quality, 3200x2133px approx. 2 hours

It is probably safe to say that the right furniture and some clever lighting you can come pretty close to reality. The lighting is a tricky part and especially difficult if you don't have anything real to compare to, e.g. when modeling a house that has yet to be built.

Hope you enjoy!

Best, slimpy

Posted by hansmex at Dec 31, 2014 4:58:04 PM
Re: Reality Check
Astonishing!! Really astonishing!! First thought was: Why would you post the same image twice...? :-)

By (partly) using incandescent or even fireglow light bulbs, you may get a slightly yellower lighting. That would approach the original even closer. You could try 1-2 bulbs of 100x100x100 cms (or even larger) at a low strength setting.

Hans

Posted by Puybaret at Dec 31, 2014 6:26:54 PM
Re: Reality Check
You found a very nice way to end a successful year. Thanks for posting these amazing images. smile

Best wishes for 2015 to you all clown
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Emmanuel Puybaret, Sweet Home 3D developer

Posted by bitacovir at Dec 31, 2014 11:44:00 PM
Re: Reality Check
People who work professionally in Architectural visualisation generally make post-process of the images (once they are been rendered with their 3D modeller program) using Photoshop. I mean, the only render never is enough for a realistic or final high quality image. So, if you want to improve the final render with photoshop, to get a more realistic result, just go on. It is a standard practice in arch-vis.

Posted by slimpy at Jan 1, 2015 2:18:56 PM
Re: Reality Check
Thank you Hans.

I already use incandescent light sources only. As you can see from the floor plan I make use of large ambient lights (power between 5% and 20%) already extensively.



The trouble with ambient light sources is that you want them to be as large as possible to have soft shadows but you also don't want them to be too close to the ceiling, floor or furniture to avoid obvious lighter spots and reflections.
If you look closely at the rendered image you notice a large white reflection on the floor just left of the bumber car. This reflection is caused by the ambient light in front of the fireplace even though this light is at 10% power only!
Getting the lights right is very time consuming because you have to render again at the best quality setting after every change. Even at very low resolutions this takes a few minutes.

I haven't tried any fireglow lights yet. I might give them a try when I've got some time. Thanks for the tip.

Best, slimpy

Posted by slimpy at Jan 1, 2015 2:22:08 PM
Re: Reality Check
You found a very nice way to end a successful year. Thanks for posting these amazing images. smile

Best wishes for 2015 to you all clown


Thanky you Emmanuel, I really appreciate your compliment.

Happy New Year everyone!

Posted by slimpy at Jan 1, 2015 2:32:55 PM
Re: Reality Check
People who work professionally in Architectural visualisation generally make post-process of the images (once they are been rendered with their 3D modeller program) using Photoshop. I mean, the only render never is enough for a realistic or final high quality image. So, if you want to improve the final render with photoshop, to get a more realistic result, just go on. It is a standard practice in arch-vis.

The main goal was to find out how accurate and realistic you can get with SH3D. This rules out any post processing of the rendered images.
I find the result quite satisfying. I also like the fact that I can reproduce the exact same result anytime. I can also change perspective, zoom in and out and render new images at the same quality quite easily.
There's a lot more work to do if you add in post processing in a third party program.

Best, slimpy

Posted by SnakeGB at Jan 2, 2015 5:11:43 PM
Re: Reality Check
Wow No, Really Wow!!!

I had to look for the tell tail signs to see what one was the render.

Posted by Akalvin at Jan 2, 2015 8:02:21 PM
Re: Reality Check
Awesome! Great job!

Posted by sjimran at Jan 20, 2015 4:11:53 PM
Re: Reality Check
Wow..........!
Super bro
good work

Posted by biko at Jan 27, 2015 3:54:48 PM
Re: Reality Check
wow

Posted by anhmax at Feb 15, 2015 12:44:51 PM
Re: Reality Check
Can you show me your pc reqs (cpu, gpu, ram)? I think 3D Sweet home isn't powerful enough to render this pic.
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Anh Đinh

Posted by slimpy at Feb 15, 2015 9:18:26 PM
Re: Reality Check
No idea how you came to the conclusion that SH3D isn't powerful enough to render this pic.

The computer that rendered this was a HP laptop sporting an Intel i7-4700MQ quad core processor and 8GB RAM.
SH3D is configured to use a maximum of 4GB of RAM.
The graphic card (although completely irrelevant for rendering at the two best quality settings) is an integrated Intel HD Graphics 4600. There is also an unused (disabled) Nvidia GeForce GT740M graphic chip.
This computer runs Linux (Opensuse) as its operating system.

The SH3D file has a size (compressed) of 62MB.
As posted previously it takes about 2 hours to render this pic at a size of 3600x2133px.

Best, slimpy

Posted by sjimran at Feb 17, 2015 3:47:01 PM
Re: Reality Check
use virtual memory to increase the RAM.

Posted by slimpy at Feb 17, 2015 9:03:20 PM
Re: Reality Check
use virtual memory to increase the RAM.

Why should I do this?
I only use half of the available memory for SH3D and I don't have any issues at all. Paging to slower swap memory doesn't sound like a good idea...

Posted by taltan at Mar 4, 2015 7:05:51 AM
Re: Reality Check
Hi! Just wondering how did you create your books and other elements of your projects? Eg book shelf.. sofa.. how are they so exact?

Many thanks!

Posted by jpcr at Mar 4, 2015 10:12:33 AM
Re: Reality Check
amazing.

i never get close to realistic in my tests , but here : wow !

jp

Posted by Desslok at Mar 4, 2015 4:43:36 PM
Re: Reality Check
Hmmm. You've given my something to think about in my Enterprise renders. I've been having trouble getting my ceiling textures to show up. They appear quite dark even when everything else in the room is well lit. I hadn't considered 'ambient light'. I will have to experiment with that. Thanks.
biggrin

Posted by slimpy at Mar 5, 2015 12:19:01 AM
Re: Reality Check
Hi! Just wondering how did you create your books and other elements of your projects? Eg book shelf.. sofa.. how are they so exact?

Many thanks!

I used different tools to model the furniture, Art of illusion (windows, sideboard, coffee table, loudspeakers), clara.io (sofa, toy box, fireplace, lamps, painting) and Blender (book shelf, bumper car)

The sofa for instance is a rather simple model using cubes with some bevelled edges. What makes it look realistic are the textures based on images of the actual fabrics of the sofa.

The books are also merely boxes with an applied image texture. Only the book spines and the first cover and last back are textured. However, getting the UV layout right for every single book was a rather tedious job.

Posted by Desslok at Mar 5, 2015 4:22:59 PM
Re: Reality Check
Concerning the books textures. I have worked out an easier way to correctly map simple textures like that. I don't use Blender. Instead, I take the original texture and import it into Sweethome3d. I size it in the editor, making note of the dimensions. Then I add a box and resize that to match the dimensions of the texture. Then I apply the texture. Then I export the box as an object. Then I can import it into Blender and place it on the bookshelf as I want it. Repeat for the other books. When all is as I like it, join all into a single object and export as object format again. Then import into the Sweethome3d Library editor. It will come in with all textures correctly oriented. biggrin

Posted by slimpy at Mar 6, 2015 9:49:26 AM
Re: Reality Check
Concerning the books textures. I have worked out an easier way to correctly map simple textures like that. I don't use Blender. Instead, I take the original texture and import it into Sweethome3d. I size it in the editor, making note of the dimensions. Then I add a box and resize that to match the dimensions of the texture. Then I apply the texture. Then I export the box as an object. Then I can import it into Blender and place it on the bookshelf as I want it. Repeat for the other books. When all is as I like it, join all into a single object and export as object format again. Then import into the Sweethome3d Library editor. It will come in with all textures correctly oriented. biggrin

Easier? Seems overly complicated for my taste. I can't imagine doing that for every single of the roughly 80 books on the shelf. That must take forever!
If you do it in Blender you can use one image for all the spines on one shelf (or even several shelves at once). Use the image as background in Blender to get the size of each individual book spine right - no need to take note of book dimensions.
Then unwrap all book spine faces at once and correct the resulting UV layout by exactly placing the faces on the texture image.
The tedious part is not actually the UV layout itself but the placement of the planes for the book spines on the background image.

I must admit that it takes some effort to learn how image textures work in Blender. But once you get the hang of it you quickly start to appreciate the possibilities it gives you.

Best, slimpy

Posted by Desslok at Mar 7, 2015 1:21:37 AM
Re: Reality Check
To each his own. You are right about the difficulty of applying textures in Blender. I can never seem to get it right. Either the texture overlaps the face it is supposed to be applied to, or it's off on one or more of the dimensions and when I try to adjust it, it seems to get worse not better. And even when I manage to get it somewhat close to what I want, when I go to import it into Sweethome3d, the textures almost always disappear. If I load the object in Blender the texture is there, load it in Sweethome3d and it's bare. I've tried putting it into zip files, zipping it with all textures. Nothing seems to work. Doing it my way, works - at least for me. If I didn't say it before let me say it now...you did good on your project. It looks fantastic.

Posted by jfs51765 at Mar 10, 2015 2:01:36 PM
Re: Reality Check
I am a newbie trying to design my living room, added lights but dont know how i can view my design with the lights on or turning the lights on. Thabk you very much for the assistance.

Posted by slimpy at Mar 15, 2015 5:34:59 PM
Re: Reality Check
@jfs51765: You should ask general questions in the appropriate forum in a new thread and not abuse other people's threads.

To anwser your question: Light sources are only visible in rendered photos or videos at the two best quality settings.
It's not possible to see the lights in the live 3D view in SH3D.
When you add a light source (or a lamp that includes a light source) it will be turned on by default. You can adjust its power in the change furniture dialog.

Best, slimpy

Posted by MsVen at Apr 4, 2015 1:19:06 AM
Re: Reality Check
Truly brilliant, slimpy. I had to look them over a few times to work out the photo from render. Well done. I understand the point of your SH3D realistic render 'experiment', but also agree with a previous poster ... that it wouldn't take much post-processing in Photoshop to make the two images exactly the same. Nice work.
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Container Housing Projects

Posted by anhmax at Aug 15, 2015 5:19:32 PM
Re: Reality Check


Where can you get the lamp? Another question, why does the lamp not reflect the light source? I see your rooms has a lot of light sources, but they don't appear on the lamp!
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Anh Đinh

Posted by slimpy at Aug 19, 2015 10:12:52 AM
Re: Reality Check
Hi AnhĐinh

You can get the lamp here.

The lamp doesn't reflect the light sources because they are generally invisible. The only thing you see when placing a light source in your scene is the lighting effect on objects.
Unlike real light sources there is no light emitting object (light bulb, etc.), only an abstract sphere from where light rays extend.

Likewise you don't see any light source directly (or indirectly in mirrors), even when placed in the middle of a room.

Best, slimpy

Posted by anhmax at Aug 19, 2015 4:34:54 PM
Re: Reality Check
Thank Simply,

I still don't get it. Did you set the lamp max shiny? Whenever I set furniture or objects shiny, they reflect all light sources. Can you help me make the lamp not reflect the light sources? You can look at my pic here.

I appreciate your help!


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Anh Đinh

Posted by slimpy at Sep 10, 2015 12:56:58 PM
Re: Reality Check
Hi AnhĐinh

Sorry for the late reply.

I think the key difference between our lamp models is that I don't rely on the shininess property of the object.
Instead, my lamp makes use of the sweethome3d_window_mirror prefix.

If the name of an object (group) in a model (e.g. the lamp) starts with sweethome3d_window_mirror, SH3D will render the object surface as a mirror (only in photo creation at the two best levels).

The mirror model in the stock furniture catalog is a good example for this feature. The following is the OBJ File of that model with the g property (object, group name) set to sweethome3d_window_mirror
# Blender3D v245 OBJ File: mirror.blend
#
# Modelled by Emmanuel Puybaret / eTeks under Blender 3d modeller for SweetHome3D
# This file is under Free Art License, see http://artlibre.org/licence/lal/en for more informations
#
# www.blender3d.org
mtllib mirror.mtl
v 20.066208 19.999985 -0.231418
v 20.066208 -19.999994 -0.231418
[...]
g sweethome3d_window_mirror
usemtl Material_mirror.jpg
s off
f 1/1 2/2 3/3 4/4
[...]

See also here.

Best, slimpy

Posted by anhmax at Sep 10, 2015 1:42:59 PM
Re: Reality Check
Thanks Slimpy for your help.

Would you be pleased to show me how to edit the properties of object? I open Furniture Editor but I can't find the way to edit object in a model like yours.
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Anh Đinh

Posted by slimpy at Sep 10, 2015 4:06:00 PM
Re: Reality Check
You can't edit the model from within SH3D or the furniture library editor.
You need to open the furniture model (original or exported from SH3D) in a 3d modeling application (Blender, Art of Illusion, etc.). You can then select the objects in question within the model and rename them by applying the sweethome3d_window_mirror prefix to the name.

If a furniture model is in OBJ format you can alternatively open the OBJ file in a text editor. Search for lines starting with g (see example of mirror model in previous post).
There is probably more than one if the model uses several colors or textures. To find out which is which you should look for the usemtl statement (usually on the next few lines). usemtl defines the material (color, texture) to be used for the group. These material names are visible in the modify furniture - materials: modify dialog in SH3D.
Identify the ones you would like to be mirrors and add the sweethome3d_window_mirror prefix to their existing group name.
e.g.
g item_1
becomes
g sweethome3d_window_mirror_item_1

Save the OBJ file and import into SH3D.

Best, slimpy